MAS
General Meeting

Topic : Infrared Observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope
Speaker: R.D. Gehrz : Member Spitzer Science Working Group (SWG)
& Professor, Interim Chair Astronomy U of MN

Science Museum of MN
Second level classroom area. St Paul, MN

Images shot on June 7th, 2007.
Shot with a Nikon D40

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Thursday June 7th,2007

MAS
SMM
MAS
Setting up
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MAS attendees
MAS
Tonight's Program
MAS
R.D. Gehrz
MAS
MAS attendees
MAS
MAS attendees
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MAS attendees
MAS
Summary
MAS
R.D. Gehrz
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R.D. Gehrz
MAS
R.D. Gehrz
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Cherry Grove Update
MAS
CG Update
MAS
Cherry Grove improvements
MAS
Q&A with MAS attendees
MAS
MAS attendees
MAS
MAS attendees

Next Meeting

The June meeting of the MAS will be held at the Science Museum of Minnesota on Thursday June 7th from 7:00 pm until 9:00 pm. The meeting will be held in the second level classroom area.

The general meeting of MAS will feature Infrared Observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope
Speaker: R.D. Gehrz : Member Spitzer Science Working Group (SWG)
Robert D. Gehrz was born in Evanston, Illinois and grew up in St. Paul, MN where he graduated from Central High School in 1963.

He received a BA in Physics from the University of Minnesota in 1967 and a PhD in Physics from the University of Minnesota in 1971. From 1972 until 1985, Gehrz was on the faculty of the Department of Physics and Astronomy of the University of Wyoming where, in collaboration with John A. Hackwell, he built the Wyoming Infrared Observatory Wyoming Infrared Observatory. The 2.34-meter Wyoming Infrared Telescope, funded jointly by the State of Wyoming and The National Science Foundation, was the largest IR telescope in the world at the time of its completion in 1977.

Since 1985, Gehrz has been a Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Director of the Observatories at the University of Minnesota and a frequent guest observer at ground based and space based observatories world-wide. In addition to conducting an extensive research effort in ground based infrared astronomical observations and instrumentation development, Gehrz is a member of the Science Working Group SWG for NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope with Facility Scientist responsibilities for the Cryogenic Telescope Assembly (CTA). His space infrared astronomy research has included programs conducted with the (International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE), the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), the European Space Agency's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the new Chandra X-ray Observatory.

He was elected a Fellow of the Explorers Club in 1979, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1995, and a Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2004. He was Chairman and member of the Board of the International Gemini Project during 1996- 1999 and was President of the American Astronomical Society during 1999-2000. During 2001, he served as a member of the Committee on the Organization and Management of Research in Astronomy and Astrophysics (COMRAA). Gehrz is a past chair and member of the NSF/NASA Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC). He currently serves as a member of the NASA James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Product Integrity Team (PIT) that reviews the optical telescope assembly. .

The Spitzer Space Telescope (formerly SIRTF, the Space Infrared Telescope Facility) was launched into space by a Delta rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida on 25 August 2003. During its mission, Spitzer will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space between wavelengths of 3 and 180 microns (1 micron is one-millionth of a meter). Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

Consisting of a 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically-cooled science instruments, Spitzer is the largest infrared telescope ever launched into space. Its highly sensitive instruments give us a unique view of the Universe and allow us to peer into regions of space which are hidden from optical telescopes. Many areas of space are filled with vast, dense clouds of gas and dust which block our view. Infrared light, however can penetrate these clouds, allowing us to peer into regions of star formation, the centers of galaxies, and into newly forming planetary systems. Infrared also brings us information about the cooler objects in space, such as smaller stars which are too dim to be detected by their visible light, extrasolar planets, and giant molecular clouds. Also, many molecules in space, including organic molecules, have their unique signatures in the infrared.


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